Jewel of the north by Tricia Stringer

Cynthia Jewel of the NorthIt was so nice to revisit the Bakers and the Wiltshires and share in their stories of life in the Flinders Ranges. This is the tird novel featuring these characters. There is hardship, joy, sorrow and survival. The Australian landscape can be beautiful and also cruel. It is a lovely insight into what pioneering farming families had to achieve and how communities were built.

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Naming Jack the Ripper by Russell Edwards

Brian Naming Jack the RipperAfter 125 years of theorizing and speculation over the identity of Jack the Ripper, Russell Edwards is in the unique position of owning the first physical evidence relating to the crimes to have emerged since 1888 – a shawl belonging to one of the “Rippers” victims, Catherine Eddowes. This evidence is from one of the crime scenes, and has now been rigorously examined by some of the most highly-qualified forensic scientists in Europe who have ascertained its true provenance. With the help of modern forensic techniques, Edward’s ground-breaking discoveries provide conclusive answers to many of the most challenging mysteries surrounding the case.

Unfortunately however, Russell Edwards is an “over-sharer” Continue reading

New review team members

We welcome three new members onto the rrlreads review team who will contribute reviews over the next 6 months.

Book reviewers 2017 Jul-Dec

Ariba : My best books are from “Pug Series” but I enjoy adventurous books too. In my free time I love to watch movies.

Kate : My love is non-fiction, especially memoirs narrated by the author (Magda Szubanski and Moby narrate their memoirs just as brilliantly as Luisa). With a seven year old (who especially LOVES books) I can do children’s picture books and I myself have been getting into a lot of young adult fiction while wondering what I had to read when a young adult myself!

Renee : I read widely but the majority of the books are commercial fiction. I tend to use the Borrowbox app for audiobooks and some ebooks more than reading paperbacks. I also review the middle-grade fiction books I read to my kids as bedtime stories.

We look forward to reading their reviews!

 

First we make the beast beautiful by Sarah Wilson

Amy First we make the beast beautifulIt was really great to get a picture of what anxiety can be like to live with; how it feels, and how easy it can be to misunderstand an anxious person. I found that element of this book fascinating and helpful. Otherwise, I found it confused and confusing, contradictory and scattered. There are many more questions in the book, than answers, but perhaps the journey will be helpful to other travellers.

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The butterfly and the violin by Kristy Cambron

Hannah The buttterfly and the violinThe Butterfly and the Violin is a sad and gentle tale of two young lovers who were sent to the Nazi concentration camps, how they survived by a small thread of hope, how they were separated and found again, and how poignant and fragile the gift of life is. I was so deeply moved by this story that I purchased my own copy. If you wish for a book that will speak deeply to your heart, this I recommend!

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Stars across the ocean by Kimberley Freeman

Cynthia Stars Across the OceanA foundling chasing her mother around the globe, a mother’s heartache at losing love and her daughter and a daughter coming to terms with her mother’s illness. Each of story is told well, but I finished the book feeling that I wanted so much more depth to each of the characters.
The ending was a surprise and I loved the way that Kimberley concealed it throughout the story.
I have enjoyed all of Kimberley’s stories that I have read and will continue to seek them out as I know I will get an interesting set of characters to read about.

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The making of MONA by Adrian Franklin

Claire The making of MONAI chose this book because it is a great example of the book as an object of beauty – that is lovely to hold – to flip between the pages – soak up the ideas – and think about a trip to Tasmania to see MONA for real. It also matches my jacket!

In the world of eBooks there are lot of reasons why the new formats are so convenient, portable and accessible. But sometimes I just want to hold a paper book – it has a certain weight in your hands, it has a beautiful layout, amazing images and it tells a story – this time it is about the mysterious art collector and successful gambler David Walsh and how he created the always controversial MONA: the Museum of Old and New Art in Hobart.

Libraries give us the chance to walk in someone else’s shoes and travel to places we may never know otherwise. Don’t forget to check out our books on design, art and architecture nest time you come to the library. Be inspired!

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