The seven husbands of Evelyn Hugo by Taylor Jenkins Reid

Cynthia 7 husbandsEvelyn seeks out Monique to tell her life story to, there is a connection which we discover only at the end of the story. Evelyn reveals her life story, what she did to make it in Hollywood and the one person she truly loved. The story is well written with realistic characters, making me wonder if it was actually based on a Hollywood star.

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Nutshell by Ian McEwan

Amy NutshellI can see why some people have not enjoyed Nutshell. The idea of an eight month old foetus narrating from the womb, having learned about the world from podcasts and conversations, is definitely ludicrous. It’s clever, though, and while the other characters are less than likeable, I found it totally compelling. It’s about the state of our world, love, lust, and hope.

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Dragon teeth by Michael Crichton

cynthia-dragon-teeth.jpgThis was a fun romp through early America and the Bone Wars (which actually happened!). We are thrown into the middle of two palaeontologists rushing to find dinosaur bones in America’s west. It did feel a bit rushed, but I guess that is because Michael is not around to fully develop the characters and storyline. I enjoyed reading about the harshness of life in the west, the adventure of it all and the thrill of discovery.

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Words in deep blue by Cath Crowley

Amy Words in Deep BlueHowling Books is a second hand bookshop, with a collection of books for people to leave letters in. Rachel comes back to town and starts working there, with the boy she used to love. This is young adult fiction, with an Australian setting, references to so many books, sweet and complicated relationships, and not too much teenage angst. It’s about loss, connection and the power of books. There’s a lot to like.

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Little fires everywhere by Celeste Ng

Amy Little Fires EverywhereHaving loved Everything I Never Told You, I expected to enjoy this book, and I did. It’s about a family with four teenaged children, living more than comfortably in an upper-middle class, American suburb. Their lives are going along as planned, until Mia and Pearl, an artist and her daughter, arrive and set in motion events that cause everyone to question what they believe about themselves. It’s about privilege, prejudice, vocation, love, fear and power. You know what has happened from the beginning, and then go back to understand why.

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La belle sauvage by Phillip Pullman

Amy la belle sauvageIt has been a long time since I read His Dark Materials, and I very much enjoyed my time back in Pullman’s Brytain. A curious and thoughtful young boy lives with his parents, in a pub outside Oxford, but as he becomes involved in the life of baby Lyra, he must make a dangerous journey. It’s a magical world, in many senses, and the journey is delightful, frightening, heart-wrenching and full of wonder. I do hope we don’t have to wait too long for the next instalment.

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MaddAddam by Margaret Atwood

Amy MaddAddamIt’s great to read a trilogy once it is complete. I have read them all this year, and I am sad to leave them behind. MaddAddam fills in all the gaps, showing how the world came to the “waterless flood”, and how they will move forward now that the world has been reset. Like the other two, it is a spookily possible future for us, frightening, but also hopeful. It’s funny, clever, full of endearing characters and cutting insight.

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