The lucky one by Caroline Overington

cynthia-the-lucky-one.jpgFamily + Money + Lies are a bad combination, as this story illustrates. There was not a lot of warmth between family members. There are a few twists throughout the story and the one at the end – eew!! Although it ties it all together, I slammed the book shut – not wanting to think what would happen in the future.

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Brilliance of the moon by Lian Hearn

Amy Brilliance of the MoonThe third out of five tales set in an evocatively conjured country based on feudal Japan, Brilliance of the Moon continues to follow Takeo and Kaede as they deal with the consequences of their actions. The setting as always is lush, full of colour and beauty, the characters are compelling and the story is full of action, contemplation, loyalty, betrayal and the search for one’s destiny.

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Across the nightingale floor by Lian Hearn

Amy Across the Nightingale FloorAcross the Nightingale Floor is set in an imagined time and place, based on feudal Japan. A young man is rescued, after his family is killed, by a man who adopts him. He discovers he has unusual skills that are highly prized, and bring him a great deal of danger and adventure. The setting is lush and luminous, the characters are compelling and it is a great story of loyalty, treachery, love, loss and honour.

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Grass for his pillow by Lian Hearn

Amy Grass for his PillowThe sort-of-Japanese setting is lush, evocative and almost the best thing about this series. Continuing on from the first book, Takeo is a young man, forced into a life he hates, and Kaede a young woman trying to overcome her misfortunes, and learn to command respect like a man. They both have a difficult journey ahead, made harder by their youthful impetuousness. I found the relationships a little too much in this book, but I am still keen for the rest of the series.

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Escape from Sunset Grove by Minna Lindgren

cynthia-escape-from-sunset-grove.jpgI knew from the first page that this would be an entertaining read. The story about a group of residents from an aged facility undergoing a retrofit was both funny and sad. I was disappointed, though, with the investigative part of the story that was slow moving and did not involve much investigating – but I guess that is what you get with a cast of characters that are 90 years+.

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The children of men by P.D. James

Amy Children of MenSet in a 2021 when no children have been born in twenty-five years, The Children of Men is a most thought-provoking dystopian novel. Theo Faren is an Oxford don, solitary and rather self-centred, until he is drawn into contact with a group of dissenters. There is a great sense of place, this beautiful, crumbling Oxford, and increasing tension as Theo’s life changes dramatically, and he is pulled out of his apathy. A clever, disturbing, and satisfying mystery.

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